Ellen Hovde, Muffie Myer, and Susan Foemke on documentaries

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Three women who had edited one of the Maysles brothers‘ documentaries and further established the art of cinema vérité talk briefly about the challenges and philosophy of editing Grey Gardens or a documentary of such nature.



Albert Maysles passed away on March 5, 2015. He along with his brother David were the pioneers of the cinema vérité documentary filmmaking, which paved the way for much of how documentaries and films are made today.

Albert Maysles

Steven Soderbergh on filmmaking – Part VI and VII

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Part VI – On process, editing.

Part VII – Writers Brian Koppelman and David Levien join Steven Soderbergh in a discussion on the nuts and bolts of filmmaking. Discussions include on cutting the footage up to camera, exposition, ideas, improvisation, seeing effort in shot designs, subjective versus objective directing, and structuring sequences without shot repetition.


EDIT: In light of a comment made in the video below about me not posting titles or as little information about the given selection as possible – may I remind everyone that I do not do that. Period. I have mentioned before the reasons why, and I have written it in the “About” page how I go about these selects.

Here it is again.

I post only the most valuable excerpts of commentary information from various films. Mainly the selects that I choose are theoretical in nature – that is, it is irrelevant what film they’re from as they are not screen specific. I mull over these bits quite a bit to make sure they can be understood on their own. Do not ask me for a TITLE whenever I post these commentaries. If you are so curious, why not and watch the director’s entire films with the commentaries on like I do? I provide a service for those who want to learn, on my own free time. On this blog I will compile best bits on cinematic language. This is less of a technical blog as it is a theoretical, analytical, and philosophical space for young filmmakers or just cinephiles who want to grasp the language of cinema.

 



John Carpenter and Jared Harris on filmmaking

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In which Jared Harris takes on the role of a moderator and asks John Carpenter about filmmaking. Discussions include production design, film looks, anamorphic, audiences, directing, film style and how it pertains to film acting, on-set discipline and market research. Previous discussions can be heard on stage fright here, and on acting here.



John McTiernan on beginnings + filmmaking philosophy – Part II (2014)

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Since the release of John McTiernan from his stint in federal prison early this April, he’s been invited to the Deauville American Film Festival last month where he gave not one, but two Masterclasses on his filmmaking. I condensed this particular one to its bare essentials which cover familiar ground discussed in the earlier commentary select I’ve put together which you can view below. I’m including a separate select that focuses simply on how McTiernan began his career for those interested simply because it fills in some details of his beginnings and what was to come to be his entire approach to filmmaking. Check out all three selects below.




Albert Hughes on filmmaking – Part I & II

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Albert Hughes (and briefly cinematographer Peter Deming) discuss the filmmaking process and approach to learning, set design, camera technique, and in Part II  on Hollywood and what it means to love the craft so much that it causes utter depression. Don’t miss that bit of lengthy discussion because for any serious filmmaker, it’s bound to hit home.




Steven Soderbergh and Mark Romanek on filmmaking – Part I-III

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In what I found to be one of the most illuminating discussions about the filmmaking process I’ve heard in a while, Soderbergh touches upon low budget filmmaking. Extensively covered points are about working with non-actors, shooting digital, and process of directing such a low budget film.